Readers’ Advisory: Read-a-likes for Kurt Vonnegut by Women Authors

 

A friend of mine recently asked for book recommendations for her partner. Her partner greatly enjoys Kurt Vonnegut, but she’d love for him to try reading more books by women. She wondered…are there female authors who strike the same chord? Scratch the same itch? Hit the same nerve? Etcetcetc. When I asked further questions, she mentioned that she thought that what he loved most about Vonnegut was the humor.

This question kind of stumped me. As I wracked my brain to figure out who I could recommend to my dear friend that was both a woman and also a read-a-like for Vonnegut, I shorted out a bit. I haven’t yet read a lot of Vonnegut, so I’m working with a handicap. I decided to pull my resources and consult my boss, who is well-read, loves Vonnegut, and has an incredible sense of humor.

Here are both her and my suggestions for my friend’s partner:

44453Dorothy Parker: Parker’s writing is sharp, witty, and incredibly hilarious in the same cynical way as Vonnegut. Satire is absolutely her realm. She got her start as a theater critic and was one of the original members of the Algonquin Round Table (along with Robert Benchley and Robert E. Sherwood). Her writing stretches across so many different styles, including poetry, short stories, and screenplays to name a few. Fun Fact, she co-wrote the script for the ORIGINAL ORIGINAL A Star Is Born starring Judy Garland. I recommend perhaps starting with her Complete Short Stories. And if you want a taste of her wit, check out this delightful list of one-liners.

 

 

51v09h1b9tl

Nora Ephron: Ephron, like Parker, is known as a prolific writer with a lot in her toolbox. She’s a journalist, screenwriter, essayist, playwright, and novelist, among other things. Most, but not all, of her writing has a strong vein of humor running through it. She writes from a frank perspective with a sharp wit, and while she’s not quiet Vonnegut-esque, she is absolutely a big name talent in humor writing! I would tell my friend’s partner to start with Wallflower at the Orgy, a collection of Ephron’s magazine writings published in 1970 that take a witty and cynical look at American culture. Ephron lived an incredible life which includes being one of the only people to know the true identity of Deep Throat before it was revealed decades after the Watergate scandal. Her perspective and talent oozes from everything she writes. She is worth your time and attention!

51keam5kkxl._sx330_bo1,204,203,200_Becky Chambers: Now we’re veering off a bit. I recently read the first installment of Chambers’ Wayfarers series and really enjoyed it!It was SUPER funny, smart, tender, and absolutely killed it as both a science fiction book and a story about found family. And if you like Firefly, Titan A.E., or Star Trek, you will probably enjoy these books. If my friend’s partner is into science fiction, I highly recommend starting there!

 

 

 

51h1pbcxbql._sx327_bo1,204,203,200_

Sarah Vowell: Vowell is more of a read-a-like for John Hodgman if you enjoyed Hodgman’s recent Vacationland: True Stories from Painful Beaches (which I did, IMMENSELY). She writes deep-dive quirky non-fiction in a really unique style that can, I admit, be hard to get used to at first. It stops just short of stream of consciousness, but man is it witty and fun! If I had to giver her humor style an official designation, I’d say it is in the vicinity of wise-crackin’. I read her Unfamiliar Fishes, which is about the history of Hawai’i and how the US basically stole it, but for for my friend’s partner I think I would recommend he try Assassination Vacation, wherein Vowell takes a roadtrip across the US to visit places where significant political assassination occurred throughout history. Fascinating!

12868761Jenny Lawson: Lawson became a big name in humor when her hit memoir Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir hit the scene in 2012. This book, which covers her childhood among other things, approaches the shit of life with humor and a big ol’ “Welp”. More appropriate for David Sedaris fans, I do think my friend’s partner will enjoy this first memoir from Lawson because it’s just so damn funny!

 

 

 

33381433Samantha Irby: (Unfortunately the only woman of color I’ve included on this list…please send me your WOC Vonnegut read-a-likes!!) Irby is a comedian and blogger known for her humorous blog bitches gotta eat and her wry, sarcastic style. Her gut-splitting essay collection We Are Never Meeting In Real Life was released in 2017 to rave reviews. This  is a great pick for my friend’s partner!

 

 

 

9780143128045Shirley Jackson: UUUHHHH WHHAAATTT?? Did your eyes just explode out of your head? This was no mistake, my friends. Yes, Jackson is known best for her haunting gothic tales, and yes I am contractually obligated to write about her as often as humanly possible.  But she also wrote about her family and what it was like to be a mother and the weirdness of life in a small community. Often these personal topics were treated with sarcastic wit. You can draw a direct line between this writing and her horror writing, but you will probably laugh more with her memoirs. I recommend my friend’s partner start with Life Among the Savages.

 

As you can see, many of these women write a lot in the “nonfiction” and “essay” genres. I find it interesting that some of the funniest writing I’ve ever read by women is, in some way, a truthful account of a situation or thought or experience or event. I think there is something to this–something that comments on the differences between how men and women interpret and experience the world. This was part of why my brain melted a bit when I first tried to contemplate this question.

My boss and I are still trying to think of additional authors who fit this bill (you thought I was out of them, ha!), so if you have any additional suggestions we would GREATLY appreciate you offering them up in the comments! It’s a difficult question because Vonnegut is so singular, and women are still fighting that ridiculous stigma put on them that they “aren’t funny”. That is incredibly false, of course, but it is still prevalent and blocks very funny women from getting their due. Let’s do our part to break it down!

2019 Resolutions and Reading!

IMG_20181220_174159Happy New Year! I hope you all were able to celebrate in a way that made you feel happy and optimistic, and I hope you have your first book of 2019 all picked out! I don’t know about you, but I’m spending the day on the couch reading FOR SURE. I’m looking forward to 2019 for many reasons. First and most important, I’m getting married! But I’m also looking forward to a new year of reading and general self-improvement (ha).

For the past six months, and for the next six months going forward, I will be very focused on planning my wedding. It’s only going to get more intense, so with that in mind I am trying to be extra kind to myself. I’m not going to set any major goals or push myself too hard, unless it’s about getting this damn wedding planned and executed in a semi-successful manner. Of course I’m going to continue to work on taking better care of myself in all ways, increase my exercise, decrease my shitty food intake, get more sleep, etcetc, but I’m not going to beat myself up about it.

In reading, I’ve decided to have a year of “free reading”. I’ve set a Goodreads goal of ten books, which we all know is nonsense for me. I’ll be reading well over that, but I don’t want to worry about making my goal or stressing over how much time I have to read. I’ve had multiple friends talk to me about how frustrating they find the weird social media pressures that Goodreads can put on you as a reader, so I’ve also started using Bookriot’s Book Tracking Spreadsheet to keep stats on my reading in a way that is very nerdy and pleasing to my librarian heart and brain!

I read 80 books in 2018, the most I’ve ever read in a year! But I anticipate that my reading time will go down for a while as I try to work on wedding centerpieces and chasing guests down for RSVPs. But I don’t want to just NOT set a goal. I enjoy logging my books in Goodreads and seeing them listed together in the yearly reading challenge, so I figured I would just set a dummy goal.

Another thing I’ve done is retire from all book clubs but one. This will eliminate a good amount of scheduled reading that I always seem to have to push through. The biggest change I will need to make is NOT putting books on hold at my library unless I’m planning on reading them right away. Library books, while better than buying a ton of books that just pile up, tend to set another kind of reading schedule in my mind. I feel like I need to read all my library books in the order they’re due back, not the order I WANT to read them in, and that stresses me out. This is all nonsense, but it bugs me just the same.

I currently have 57-ish books checked out and like 13 holds. A bunch of those holds are not ready for me to pick up. They’re all hot buzzy books with long wait lists. How will I read them all before they’re due?? And any book I was hoping to read next is now immediately bumped because I NEED to read N.K. Jemisin’s How Long ’til Black Future Month RIGHT FRICKEN NOW because there is no way I’ll be able to renew. So that copy of Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi that I borrowed from my coworker months ago will still be sitting on my bedside table, untouched.

See how this creates an issue? So, no more library holds unless I intend to read it as soon as it gets in. And only one or two holds at a time. I need to keep my reading schedule loose and open so I can embrace more spontaneous reading!

I have so many beautiful, exciting, fun books on my shelves at home. I’m desperate to read them, but because I own them I always push them aside in favor of the library or book club books. In 2019, I’m really hoping that I will have more moments where I finish a book, set it down, and don’t have the next book picked out already. I’d love to finish a book and then browse my own bookshelves to find a book to read based on how I’m feeling in that moment, not what I wanted to read two weeks ago. Let’s see if I can accomplish this.

download_20180919_174205

Love @dasharezone too much.

And with all this in mind, my only true goal in 2019 (other than accomplishing the act of getting married) is to get to a point where I don’t order anything from Amazon anymore. I want to cut my dependence on the website and shop, instead, more locally. The ultimate goal is that next year’s Christmas gifts for my family will be 100% bought NOT on Amazon. I have the whole year to practice and get ready for the test haha. While I don’t really use Amazon for books all that much anymore, I’d like to make it a habit to visit a different local book store here in Pittsburgh once a month. It would be a nice opportunity to spend time and money in different parts of the city, see what cool stuff is out there, grab that buzzy new book I’ve been drooling over, and see some adorable book stores I haven’t been able to visit yet!

IMG_20180325_115155 (1)

Local book stores have the best sections. This is at The Big Idea in Bloomfield, Pittsburgh PA

Life has been really hard lately, and the anxiety and stress from the news and the outside world has had the same effect on me as probably most people: I’m extra tired, I’m extra grumpy, and I’m extra overwhelmed. While I try my best to do my part–contact my elected officials, support local and national groups, volunteer–I’m only one person. What all of this has really pushed me to do is take care of myself. I hadn’t been to a general practitioner in 13 years until 2018. I also just went to the dentist for the first time in 8 years. I saw a therapist for the first time in 8 years. And I treated myself to a full read/reread of Harry Potter! But, embarrassingly, this is just the beginning. I have many more medical appointments to make, little life upkeep things that need to be done. I desperately need my passport and a new prescription for my glasses. There’s just, shit to do. I’m really looking forward to 2019 as a year where I can maybe get a handle on it. As someone who has spent a lot of time putting my energy outward into activities and other people, this almost feels selfish. I feel bad spending my money and time on my health, which is weird. It’s something I’m working on, but it still gets to me. 2018 was a year of what felt like a lot of little steps backwards and away from things. For the first time in a while I didn’t feel like I actually accomplished anything. Here’s to 2019 being a building year!

What about you? What are your reading and life goals for the year to come? It’s cool if the answer is “nothing” because for some of us, that’s a goal in and of itself.

Favorite Books Read In 2018

I had a weird reading year. I set a Goodreads goal of 50 and surpassed it handily, reading 76+ books in 2018. Once again I totally failed at my annual Shameful Book Club, so much so that I think I’m going to retire it for next year. I enjoyed most of the books I read in 2018, really disliked a handful, and really liked quite a few. I also, in a very rare move for me, reread quite a few books this year. I reread some Shirley Jackson, Robert Galbraith, Stephen King, and JK Rowling (yes, I know she is also Galbraith but I reread both series this year). I don’t normally reread, but I was in need of comfort so I returned to some of my favorites.

I also want to make a note that at the time that I compiled this list, there were still several weeks left of 2018. I’m still reading books, and it’s possible those books would have ended up on this list, but I had to cut myself off at some point ;)

Below are the 22 books that really stood out to me this year. They are not the only books I really liked, but the ones that stuck with me the most. I tried to include trigger warnings as I remember them, but some might have slipped through my memory. (warning, this is a long post)

Continue reading

Readers’ Advisory: Supernatural Thrillers With Female Leads

A friend of mine texted me this very wheelhousey RA question a while back…and I was very very excited.

“Hey! I need a book recommendation and I figured you were just the lady I should ask. Do you know of any good thriller type books to recommend? Something real disturbing. Preferably with a kickass female lead. Maybe supernatural?”

I only sent her a handful of the books below, but I thought I would expand the list here! In addition to her female lead request, I also made all of my recommendations written by women as well. I’ve read most of these, and the ones I haven’t gotten to yet I have sitting on my bookshelves, waiting for me to dive in!

Continue reading

Library Work: Helping Teens with Resumes

13903379490_e08650368b_bI’ve been slacking on my library posts. Last fall I submitted my last blog post to the Youth Services Division of PaLA. It discussed my particular approach to helping teens write resumes. I really loved doing that work when I was in my public library. Now that I’m in an academic library, they don’t really have much need for a librarian to do that. In fact, we have a totally separate career center in the basement of the library that is completely devoted to that work! Anyway, below is my blog post for those of you who work with teens and find yourself in a position to help them write their very first resume. This might be good for anyone to review who knows a teen planning to go job hunting this summer.

Continue reading

Readers’ Advisory: Summer of SciFi!

Barbarella_onesheet_1977RR_International_BorisVallejo-5

Barbarella…I can’t help but love her and her sexy ways.

This was a readers’ advisory for me, myself. I declared the summer of 2018 the Summer of SciFi! I grew up loving science fiction movies and pop culture, but it took me a long time to actually start reading it. I’m still very behind on all the classics, but this summer for some reason, *ahem* escapism *ahem*, I really started to crave full scifi immersion. My goal is to catch up on the science fiction films and TV that I have missed over the past few years (Arrival, the new Lost in Space, Annihilation, the new Alien movie, etc forever) and enjoy some fun science fiction books! If you have any good music playlists or fun scifi-themed activities you think I should check out to help make my summer complete, please let me know in the comments!

Now to the books. For the longest time, I felt like I needed to read all the classics, but they’re all so long and kind of dry and very sexist. I’ve decided to throw that idea out the window. I’m super inspired by my new favorite book podcast from Bookriot, SFF Yeah!, hosted by Jenn and Sharifah Williams (who I honestly have the biggest crush on, she’s so cool and smart and nerdy and beautiful and a Slytherin). They talk about all things science fiction and fantasy in the book world, and they have mentioned some really amazing books that I either had never heard of or had heard of but kept putting off. Their discussion of these books has really made me want to read them like ASAP. So thank you Jenn and Sharifah :)

DTxlr7FX4AA-_8J

Below is my 12-book tbr for Summer of SciFi! I have been so excited about the books that I’ve picked that it’s all I’ve been talking about int our apartment. My fiance is surely tired of me sighing and saying, “I can’t wait to read my scifi books!” and then launch into a full summary of one of them. I chose mostly women authors and women protagonists, which is important to me (they’re also kind of the most interesting voices in scifi/fantasy right now), but I did add a couple gents in there because their books just sound amazing. There are wonderful science fiction authors from all walks of life! I have tried to provide trigger warnings where I can, but I haven’t read these yet so I can only go off of what summaries tell me. I will say that most of these seem dark/violent, so proceed with caution.

Continue reading

No New Books, 2018!

fd8f06c5ecf895caced1fd4f6398163b--funny-reading-quotes-quotes-about-reading-booksSo, like many of my book lovers and librarians before me, I have fallen into a crisis situation concerning the number of books I have in my apartment and on my tbr list. My To Read list on Goodreads is over 2,300 at the time of this post, the number of books I have checked out from the library is currently about 60 (down from 87), I have hundreds of books in my apartment currently (but that’s hardly the total number I own…I have them stashed everywhere), and I buy at least two new books a month for my book clubs, not to mention my impulse emotional book buying (which I’ve been doing a lot of post-wedding dress shopping). This needs to stop. I can’t fit these books in my space anymore, and what is worse, I can’t read them all. Most of the books I own I haven’t read. So that is why I am going to take a bold step for 2018: I won’t be buying or checking out any new books to the best of my ability. Sure, I’ll have slip-ups, and for my one book club I’ll still be buying the book because sales are donated to Planned Parenthood, but this new rule will at least keep me in check.

So what does this mean? It means that I will actually be reading books I own! And then perhaps I’ll be able to get rid of a few of them. I’m sure I’ll really hate a couple…can’t love them all. So for Shameful Book Club I will only be selecting books I own, which adds another layer to my shame because I took the step of actually buying these books and yet still haven’t read them. For most of my other book clubs, I’ll have to just let go. This is going to be insanely difficult for me, because I’m a book club enthusiast and belong to five currently. I’m constantly looking to join more. But if they don’t read a book I own, I won’t be able to participate.

IMG_20171207_165703

My bedroom.

While I’m going to hate this, I know it’s the right move. It will free up so much of my reading time and give me actual choice over what I’m picking up. My reading is so dictated by book clubs and library due dates that I hardly ever get to read spontaneously or catch up on personal reading. This is partly why I haven’t read most of the books I own. About 37% of the books I read last year were books I had to read for book clubs alone. That doesn’t include books for work or projects.

IMG_20171207_165749

Shelves and boxes of books I own and a crate of library books in my office.

This also means I won’t be checking out books from the library. Since I work at a library and find it emotionally satisfying to check out arm fulls of books at a time, this will also be a challenge. Again, I’m sure there will be a slip-up here and there, but hopefully I won’t have more than two library books checked out at a time. My plan is to read as many of my currently checked out books as I can, and as I return them I won’t be replacing them. It’s hard for me to resist impulse check-outs, especially because I read so many book blogs and lists. I’m always snatching up the new best seller or forgotten classic that industry folks recommend. But if I’m doing that, I’m not reading my own books, and I’m filling up my living space with more piles.

IMG_20171207_165846

Some of my library books.

What do I hope to achieve? A better understanding of my own collection, for one. I have such a random selection of books, and I’d like to see what it all feels like and looks like in terms of representing who I am as a person. I’ve been reading a lot about the art of book collecting and how crafting a personal collection is different from amassing a personal library. I will still have a library, but it would be fun to identify and build off of budding collections in my existing library.

I’d also LOVE an opportunity to weed my own library, but my anxiety and book obsession will not allow me to ditch books I haven’t read. I want to read them, assess them, and then either keep or dispose of them in some way. This ties back into the overall vibe of my personal collection and how I want to curate it. I know that seems a bit odd to think about curating your own books, but to me it seems like an interesting project and a cool way to express myself. Freeing up shelf space would also be amazing. Our apartment, while bigger than our last, lacks a bit on storage. Having shelves for things other than books would help with that. If I’m able to get all of my library books returned, that will free up an entire bookshelf. AN ENTIRE BOOKSHELF!!!

IMG_20171207_170031

My “orderly” shelf.

Another interesting idea that I read about was buying books with specific reasoning in mind. I recently saw an article written by a young poet who discussed how she rarely buys books, but when she does it means a lot to her. She proceeded to go through and list every book she bought in 2016 and why exactly she bought that book. I know I won’t be perfect in 2018 when it comes to #nonewbooks, but if I approach it with this idea in mind, I will be working on good habits and have a really interesting collection to talk about at the end of the year.

What about you and your book buying habits? Want to join me on this foolhardy journey?

Reader’s Advisory: Native American and Indigenous Literature by Women

joy-harjo-hires-cropped

Joy Harjo, looking like the amazing badass that she is.

This RA was for myself. I grew up in the Finger Lakes region, right in the middle of Haudenosaunne (Iroquois) territory. The Onondaga Reservation is a bout 40 minutes from the house I grew up in. They are The Keepers of the Fire, which means that in the metaphorical longhouse that the Six Nations create together, they are the central group. Physically, they are in fact central. This means that when larger events happen that include other member tribes, they usually happen on Onondaga territory. The Onondaga Reservation more or less acts as the capitol of the Iroquois Confederacy. I had excitedly planned to run the Trail Run 5k they host on the res for Thanksgiving this year, but I ended up deciding not to go home for Thanksgiving all together. I will absolutely run it next year, however, because I don’t really go to the res that often and it would be nice to run through it. Also, the registration cost for the race goes to the reservation, as far as I know. And who doesn’t love running a 5k at the ass-crack of dawn in super cold Central New York in November while potentially hung-over?????????????

Being from New York, where the Iroquois Confederacy (the original democracy in North America) and the Six Nations are still very influential, I could find and experience native and indigenous culture pretty conveniently. We have amazing museums, reservations that do programming, people with native roots who are willing to teach and educate the rest of us…it’s great! Well, I took that for granted (understatement). Pennsylvania does things differently.

Before I dive in to this post further, hit play on this badass #FeministFriday playlist crafted by Spotify and populated entirely by indigenous female musical artists. It’s fucking amazing. Enjoy while you read:

Continue reading

Readers’ Advisory: Fantasy for tween girls

pexels-photo-256546A skill that librarians must hone is Readers’ Advisory. This is, in simple terms, recommending books to people. But it can be a much harder job than it sounds. People will come up and ask things like, “I read a book recently about a beach. It had a red cover and I think there was a love story. I really liked it but cant’ remember the name. Can you recommend other books like it for me to read?” Obviously some follow up questions are necessary, as is making use of review websites, the library catalog and OPAC, and maybe even something a bit more intense (World CAT anyone?) to figure out what exactly they are talking about. You also have the, “I’m looking for more (insert genre) to read, any suggestions?” In this case, the questions you ask are really important. You need to know what about that genre the reader likes, what they have read in the past, any authors they’re in to, and even other genres they enjoy (because no genre exists in a vacuum). Readers’ Advisory can be so much fun, but if you don’t stay practiced in it, it can also be a horrible nightmare.

I read many books in a decently wide variety of topics and genres, but it is impossible for me to read or know of everything. In order to do RA well, I need to be using these different resources to confidently recommend books to patrons without knowing much about them myself. Another resources are my friends and coworkers, because they read stuff I don’t.

I don’t get to do a ton of RA at my current jobs, even though one is in a public library. And I’m moving to a new job soon where I probably won’t be doing any RA. This bums me out because I love RA and I need to practice RA regularly. Luckily, my friends have started to keep me busy. Recently I’ve had a few friends message me independently of one another, asking for book recommendations on one thing or another. I had so much fun filling their requests, and I thought I would post one of them here. I also would love to make this a regular thing on my blog, so if anyone has any RA questions, throw them at me! I’d love to give you a list of recommendations!

Ok, the question was from a friend asking on the behalf of friends of hers who said:

Continue reading

Virtual Reality in Libraries

IMG_3890I’ve been working with virtual reality technology and equipment in my library lately, so I thought I would share some of my thoughts and experiences since it seems to be something many libraries are looking at or considering. As part of the Pennsylvania Library Association, I volunteer to write blogs for the Youth Services Division. Since only members can access the blog, I thought I would just copy and past what I submitted here.

Virtual reality is fast becoming more commercial and accessible option for programming within libraries. Libraries across the country are incorporating virtual reality into existing programming and developing specific programming around the technology for all ages. At the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, thanks to the help of an internal grant, I was recently able to purchase a variety of virtual reality headsets and content creation equipment. I used this equipment to develop programming that was deployed in multiple departments across multiple CLP branches for all ages.

So, what fun goodies did I decide to purchase for this project? After consulting with our digital technology department and other technology educators, I decided to purchase two Samsung Gear VR headsets, two corresponding Samsung Galaxy 6s phones, two Google Daydream headsets, two corresponding Google Pixels phones, two Google Cardboard headsets, a Ricoh Theta 360 camera for content creation, and a selfie stick and tripod to help gather content stylistically. Having this range has been greatly beneficial, because each types of headset has a different strength. If I had to recommend one, however, it would be the Google Daydream.

I have used this equipment for programming ranging from passive to intensive. On the passive end, we used the basic Google Cardboard headsets as a replacement for the popular jigsaw puzzles. We set the headsets out (in view of a desk) along with an instruction sheet that walks patrons through determining if their phone or device is compatible with the headset (most are), how to download Cardboard apps, and offering a list of suggested apps to start with. Staff does have to be able to get some patrons started on the devices, but others help themselves with no need of guidance.

We have also incorporated the Daydreams and Gear VRs into existing game night programming for teens and tweens, brought the headsets to outreach at local high schools, offered family friendly walk-in open play sessions for all patrons (with staff available to teach and supervise), and finally we have offered content creation workshops for teens in partnership with Carnegie Mellon University.

The content creation programs are a wonderful way to incorporate the ideas of STEAM into your teen programming. It helps them develop soft skills like project management, teamwork, communication, and delegation, and it promotes creative and technical skills. We were fortunate to be able to have access to a simple drag-and-drop program from CMU called Social VR. This program allows you to create a navigable virtual reality experience using still 360 photos and audio. You can create a virtual space with a 360 photo and then annotate it with additional audio and still image pop-ups. You can then string a number of these virtual “rooms” together so users can move from one to the other.

While Social VR is still at a developmental stage and not yet available for consumer use, another option is Audiovista, a CMU offering that is incredibly simple to create and free for anyone to use. You can find out more about what an Audiovista is and how to make one online here (http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~illah/AUDIOVISTA/audiovista.html) or by searching online for Audiovista CMU. Their project page offers video tutorials for creating content using both iMovie and Windows Media Maker.

Content creation programs work best with small groups of teens working together on a single project. We also tend to break up the program into two or three sessions. The first is to decide what they want their project to be about and then go collect that content using the 360 camera and an audio recorder, which can be as simple as a cell phone or as advances as a Zoom recorder. The next day we teach them about how to save and label files properly for a digital project. I’m always looking for ways to teach good digital file management! We then go about actually building the Audiovista and uploading it to YouTube. Sometimes we’ve used yet another day to show off their project to parents. One branch within the CLP system is planning to use their Summer Reading kick-off event as a way to showcase what the kids have created.

When I first started thinking about purchasing virtual reality equipment, I had it in mind that my department (which specifically focuses on job and career development) could use them to help develop soft skills in patrons. I fast learned that the content was not yet available for that kind of work, but there was a lot of potential for using it in teen programming. That being said, the virtual reality programs work well for almost every age group. Some individuals react better to it than others. Make sure to warn patrons and users of the health and safety risks before they put on the headset. People with epilepsy should not use the headsets, and people with extreme motion sickness or vitigo should be aware that their chances of discomfort are very high. While headsets like these are recommended for 13 and up, the only risks that I have found for children using them are the same as other types of screen exposure. You just want to monitor how long they are using the headset and keep those screen time limits in mind.

Are you interested in more information on how to implement any of these programs in your library? I would be more than happy to help! Please email me for more content, such as program sheets, a sample budget, and a list of program ideas. I’m always excited to share ideas and collaborate. I hope you were inspired by this post!

If you have any questions or want to chat about VR programming and its potential, comment! I’d love to get into it!