How I Discover Books

IMG_20190731_082053If you follow me on Instagram (or just know me as a human), you know that I love giving book talks and recommendations. I also love to talk about different book-related resources and discovery tools. A while ago, a friend of mine requested a blog post that put all these resources in one place for all you bookish babes. I am, of course, here to please.

First of all, I’m obviously going to say, “GO TO THE LIBRARY!” Librarians are on hand to offer you on-the-spot book recommendations, and they (read “I”) love to do it. It’s like a fun puzzle that needs to be solved. You can also ask me for book recommendations directly. I adore giving recommendations and would do it all day long if I could. And if you haven’t tapped into the Instagram #Bookstagram community yet, make sure you get on that! Book recs all day long!

Below is a list of websites, tools, apps, book boxes/subscriptions, and podcasts that I’m addicted to that help me discover books, talk about books, and manage my book ownership and reading life! All of these things I have tried and enjoy. Warning, quite a few things are specific to genre, so if you’re not a fan of that genre maybe it isn’t for you.

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Book Review: A Cosmology of Monsters by Shaun Hamill

OUT SEPTEMBER 17TH! Thank you to Pantheon for providing me with an advance review copy in exchange for an honest review.
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From Goodreads

There are monsters in the world, unspeakable evils that rob us of that which is most precious to us. Life can break your heart and rip you apart, but Noah Turner has more to contend with than the familiar horrors of human existence. Noah can see monsters, like real monsters. Big harry creatures. And they can see him too.

Shaun Hamill’s A Cosmology of Monsters is an incredibly touching story about the Turner family. What starts off as a cute love story quickly turns to sorrow as Harry and Margaret Turner and their three children face tragedy after tragedy over the years. But in the midst of their struggles (struggles that many of us would recognize and be acquainted with), a fantastical element rears it’s furry, sharp-toothed head. A true monster has had its sights on the Turner family for decades, and Noah, the youngest, decides to let it into his home, his family, and his heart. What Noah doesn’t know is that his father also saw monsters, and his mother knew something was wrong.

I knew from the cover art that this was a book I needed to pick up. Once I read the synopsis I was hooked, and I couldn’t put it down. This stunning literary horror debut hit me in all the right places. I was up way past lights out flipping the pages, fully invested in the Turner family’s story and the monster(s) that haven’t stopped haunting them for generations. I couldn’t get enough of the throwback 80s/90s vibes mixed with Lovecraftian horror! Despite it being a horror/fantasy novel, I found it oddly relatable.

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Book Review: Trick Mirror by Jia Tolentino

OUT NOW! Thank you to Random House Publishing Group for providing me with an advance review copy in exchange for an honest review.
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Trick Mirror cover art. Image from Goodreads.com.

My girlfriends and I are in our early 30s. We have grown up in a strange time and continue to struggle to navigate an increasingly complicated society. Social and environmental consciousness, extreme debt, global connectivity, and political turmoil occupy our attention. Couple all this with internal conflicts specific to us at this time in our lives (the questions of marriage and motherhood, careers, our identities as grown women, the concept of permanence in a community), and it’s no surprise we felt drawn to Jia Tolentino‘s work at The New Yorker. We couldn’t stop talking about her piece “What It Takes to Put Your Phone Away”, where Tolentino attempts to live as analog as possible for a time.

It led us to additional questions…how had our childhoods informed our adulthoods? How much of our past has already been erased or made obsolete? How much will never be erased? Can we take a step back from the fast-paced world we live in, from technology? Can we protect our autonomy, our privacy, our free will? DO we know ourselves?

In her debut essay collection Trick Mirror, Tolentino asks these questions, compiles context, recognizes our struggles, and sympathizes with us. It is a masterful examination of the Millennial experience. Through smart examinations of social media, the Great Recession, the student loan crisis, Amazon and Facebook, reality TV, mainstream capitalistic feminism, and other hallmarks of a Millennial upbringing, she shows us a potential answers to the “why” questions many of us ask ourselves late at night with friends after a couple drinks.

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Library Work: Helping Teens with Resumes

13903379490_e08650368b_bI’ve been slacking on my library posts. Last fall I submitted my last blog post to the Youth Services Division of PaLA. It discussed my particular approach to helping teens write resumes. I really loved doing that work when I was in my public library. Now that I’m in an academic library, they don’t really have much need for a librarian to do that. In fact, we have a totally separate career center in the basement of the library that is completely devoted to that work! Anyway, below is my blog post for those of you who work with teens and find yourself in a position to help them write their very first resume. This might be good for anyone to review who knows a teen planning to go job hunting this summer.

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Reader’s Advisory: Native American and Indigenous Literature by Women

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Joy Harjo, looking like the amazing badass that she is.

This RA was for myself. I grew up in the Finger Lakes region, right in the middle of Haudenosaunne (Iroquois) territory. The Onondaga Reservation is a bout 40 minutes from the house I grew up in. They are The Keepers of the Fire, which means that in the metaphorical longhouse that the Six Nations create together, they are the central group. Physically, they are in fact central. This means that when larger events happen that include other member tribes, they usually happen on Onondaga territory. The Onondaga Reservation more or less acts as the capitol of the Iroquois Confederacy. I had excitedly planned to run the Trail Run 5k they host on the res for Thanksgiving this year, but I ended up deciding not to go home for Thanksgiving all together. I will absolutely run it next year, however, because I don’t really go to the res that often and it would be nice to run through it. Also, the registration cost for the race goes to the reservation, as far as I know. And who doesn’t love running a 5k at the ass-crack of dawn in super cold Central New York in November while potentially hung-over?????????????

Being from New York, where the Iroquois Confederacy (the original democracy in North America) and the Six Nations are still very influential, I could find and experience native and indigenous culture pretty conveniently. We have amazing museums, reservations that do programming, people with native roots who are willing to teach and educate the rest of us…it’s great! Well, I took that for granted (understatement). Pennsylvania does things differently.

Before I dive in to this post further, hit play on this badass #FeministFriday playlist crafted by Spotify and populated entirely by indigenous female musical artists. It’s fucking amazing. Enjoy while you read:

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Time To Be a Librarian

As I mentioned in my last Shameful Book Club post, I will be starting the incredible MLIS program at the University of Pittsburgh next month, and I can’t wait. No really, I can’t wait. I already bought my text books and am getting a head start on the reading (yes, I’m a Rory Gilmore). I thought I would write a post about all of this because people have been asking and it’s going to cause a change in my blog, so might as well explain that!

PiTT-SM-1431459890572-18ec7b2ee897579a0647b45cbc48dc5da268f9fb-256wI’m pretty sure my taking this path makes sense to most people who know me. My mother is a librarian, I grew up in the stacks, I love books, and my professional skill set is very skewed toward program management and public interaction. Therefore, a librarianship doesn’t seem so out of place for me. There are multiple paths I could take as a library professional that would compliment my experience, interests, and skills: film archival to get that undergrad degree in play, music librarian because that is a bit of an obsession of mine, academic librarian because I love higher education and researching obscure topics, museum work for much of the same reasons, or public librarianship, which is what I’ve decided to focus on.

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