Book Review: The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern

Thank you to Doubleday Books and NetGalley for providing me with an advance review copy in exchange for an honest review.
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Image from Goodreads

The Night Circus was a bit of a slow burn phenomenon for the bookish world. Over the 7/8 years since it was published, people have found it and fallen deeply in love with it at their own pace. I didn’t go crazy over The Night Circus when I first read it, but all these years later I find myself thinking about it a lot. The atmosphere, the setting, the magic, the character relationships. It really stuck in my brain, so I was very excited to hear that Morgenstern was finally coming out with a new book this year!

I was shocked when I saw The Starless Sea available for request on NetGalley. I had just assumed it would remain elusive and exclusive to only the most renowned of book reviewers. I was even more surprised when I was approved for the digital ARC.

A real quick synopsis: Zachary Ezra Rawlins is a grad student studying immersive media (video games) design and storytelling. One day he stumbles on a mysterious book in the library that appears to be a collection of short fairy tales and folklore. The thing is…a true story from his childhood is in this book. No one else knows this story but Zachary, and on top of that, the book looks to have been written way before Zachary was born. He starts to do some digging and in the process gets stuck down in a weird underground magical library where clothes are perfectly tailored for him and the food is exactly what you need and cats wander everywhere. But there is like, no one else in this library. The space itself is confusing and labyrinthine, and time and place don’t hold much power.

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Interactive Displays in the Library

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One of my interactive displays @ CLP’s JCEC

It’s been a while since I wrote about my work in libraries. I honestly haven’t had too many fun things to mention, just business as usual for the most part. But recently, a colleague sent me this blog post from the Pennsylvania Library Association’s College & Research Division about using interactive displays in your library. I’ve actually been doing these kinds of displays for a long time, so I thought maybe I would talk about them and how I’ve been expanding them into the digital humanities realm.

Interactive displays and polls are a concept borrowed from museums as a way to engage patrons. If used strategically, you can also gather anonymous data about your users that can then be used to inform your services and programs. When I was at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh’s Job and Career Education Center a few years back, I started putting together what were basically interactive graphs. They were basically just large sheets of paper with a graph and it’s axes written on it and patrons would follow the directions to insert their own data point on the graph. We made graphs that asked why people moved to or away from Pittsburgh (the color of the sticker you picked to put on the graph would indicate the reason), what industry folks worked in, how confident they were in their job search, stuff like that. The information we gathered was important to how we ran the department.

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How I Discover Books

IMG_20190731_082053If you follow me on Instagram (or just know me as a human), you know that I love giving book talks and recommendations. I also love to talk about different book-related resources and discovery tools. A while ago, a friend of mine requested a blog post that put all these resources in one place for all you bookish babes. I am, of course, here to please.

First of all, I’m obviously going to say, “GO TO THE LIBRARY!” Librarians are on hand to offer you on-the-spot book recommendations, and they (read “I”) love to do it. It’s like a fun puzzle that needs to be solved. You can also ask me for book recommendations directly. I adore giving recommendations and would do it all day long if I could. And if you haven’t tapped into the Instagram #Bookstagram community yet, make sure you get on that! Book recs all day long!

Below is a list of websites, tools, apps, book boxes/subscriptions, and podcasts that I’m addicted to that help me discover books, talk about books, and manage my book ownership and reading life! All of these things I have tried and enjoy. Warning, quite a few things are specific to genre, so if you’re not a fan of that genre maybe it isn’t for you.

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Time To Be a Librarian

As I mentioned in my last Shameful Book Club post, I will be starting the incredible MLIS program at the University of Pittsburgh next month, and I can’t wait. No really, I can’t wait. I already bought my text books and amΒ getting a head start on the readingΒ (yes, I’m a Rory Gilmore). I thought I would write a post about all of this because people have been asking and it’s going to cause a change in my blog, so might as well explain that!

PiTT-SM-1431459890572-18ec7b2ee897579a0647b45cbc48dc5da268f9fb-256wI’m pretty sure my taking this path makes sense to most people who know me. My mother is a librarian, I grew up in the stacks, I love books, and my professional skill set is very skewed toward program management and public interaction. Therefore, a librarianship doesn’t seem so out of place for me. There are multiple paths I could take as a library professional that would compliment my experience, interests, and skills: film archival to get that undergrad degree in play, music librarian because that is a bit of an obsession of mine, academic librarian because I love higher education and researching obscure topics, museum work for much of the same reasons, or public librarianship, which is what I’ve decided to focus on.

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