The Hitchcock Haul: Young and Innocent  (1937)

MV5BMTExMjk2NTMyODBeQTJeQWpwZ15BbWU3MDcyMzMyMjE@._V1_SX214_A violent murder. A severe misunderstanding. An unlikely pair on the run. A camaraderie born. Clues! Sounds like a classic Hitchcock to me.

Known in the US as The Girl Was Young, Hitchcock’s BritishΒ Young and Innocent stars the little girl from The Man Who Knew Too Much,Β Nova Pilbeam, as the Chief Constable’s daughter who finds herself on the run with murder suspect Robert Tisdall (Derrick De Marney).

The film begins on a stormy night (best way to start anything, in my opinion). A famous actress argues with her estranged husband about an affair she may or may not be having. After she half-heartedly slaps him several times, he walks out into the rain offering nothing but a really awkward facial twitch as a response. The next morning, the actress’ strangled body is found dumped in the ocean by none other than the man her husband accused her of fraternizing with: Robert Tisdall.

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The Hitchcock Haul: The Man Who Knew Too Much Double Feature

imagesHitchcock made The Man Who Knew Too Much in 1934 during his career in England. It starred Peter Lorre and was a hit at the box office and with critics. In 1956 while in America, he remade The Man Who Knew Too Much to fulfill a contract obligation with Paramount and cast Jimmy Stewart and Doris DayΒ as the leads. He agreed with the studio heads that his original was a great film with room for wonderful improvement in the new era of filmmaking. This week I watched both versions of the film back to back, and came to the conclusion that the 1956 version may have been a better film at the time, but that ruling doesn’t stand today. Ultimately, I think the 1934 version is more engaging and a better example of storytelling.

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