The Hitchcock Haul: The Man Who Knew Too Much Double Feature

imagesHitchcock made The Man Who Knew Too Much in 1934 during his career in England. It starred Peter Lorre and was a hit at the box office and with critics. In 1956 while in America, he remade The Man Who Knew Too Much to fulfill a contract obligation with Paramount and cast Jimmy Stewart and Doris DayΒ as the leads. He agreed with the studio heads that his original was a great film with room for wonderful improvement in the new era of filmmaking. This week I watched both versions of the film back to back, and came to the conclusion that the 1956 version may have been a better film at the time, but that ruling doesn’t stand today. Ultimately, I think the 1934 version is more engaging and a better example of storytelling.

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The Hitchcock Haul: To Catch a Thief  (1955)

220px-To_Catch_a_ThiefI’ll admit, I trailed off a bit in the middle of Hitchcock‘s To Catch a Thief. The movie is so incredibly pretty that I kind of turned off my critical brain and focused on my instant gratification brain. It doesn’t help that the plot is rather standard without many twists to keep you on your feet.

Written by John Michael Hayes (a frequent Hitchcock collaborator), To Catch a Thief was loosely based on the novel of the same name by David Dodge. I haven’t read the book, but if I’d imagine it’s fun for the beach.

But seriously, the film won an Oscar for Best Cinematography, and by god it earned it! Also, with the added glamour of Grace Kelly and Cary Grant, good luck keeping your focus on what’s actually happening.

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