The Shameful Book Club: Gothic Novels for Fall

220px-Vampyre_title_page_1819It’s time for my second seasonal writing challenge! Over the summer I attempted to tackled an enormous amount of Southern writers’ work that I had never gotten to before, and even though I wasn’t able to reach my goal, the books I did read were awesome. Now it’s time to move on to a genre that I am better versed in: Gothic literature!

I took a Gothic lit class in college, and we hit the classics like Poe, Jane Eyre, and The Castle of Otronto, but there are so many good ones out there. I even allowed some flexibility to bring in some more recent gothic literature, because sometimes the old stuff can get, well, old. Please don’t be turned off by that, we should all be reading Gothic literature.

I chose Gothic novels for the fall (October through December) because obviously the fall is a dark and spooky (yet beautiful) time of year. You feel naturally inclined to curl up under a blanket with a cup of tea and a creepy book. And obviously there’s Halloween. Next fall I will probably pick more modern horror novels (because I have a couple of holes in that genre as well), but this year I wanted to get back to the basics.

Here are the Gothic novels in (flexible) order of how I will read them:

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The Hitchcock Haul: Rebecca (1940)

rebecca1940dvdThis film has a special place in my heart. It, along with the novel by Daphne du Maurier, turned me onto mysteries and thrillers — something I’ve been obsessed with ever since.

Just to set the bar, we’re talking about a movie that has a 100% rating on Rotten Tomatoes and earned Hitchcock his only Best Picture Oscar. It is a beautifully haunting and tantalizing film, and yet still not as good as the book.

rebecca-by-daphne-du-maurier

When I was younger and starting to get into Hitchcock, my Mom would talk about the film Rebecca and how great it was, but she could never get her hands on it to watch. When Netflix came out, we signed up right away (it was like destiny), and one of the first films my Mom put on the queue was Rebecca. It was unavailable for YEARS! Finally, after I graduated from college, we were mailed our copy.

At this point I had already read the novel out of anticipation. It delighted me! The scandal was incredibly juicy for something written in 1938, and the psychological horror that was prevalent throughout was amazing. The important twists in plot impressed me. They were both shocking and plausible. It’s a tale of sexual deviance, resentment, and coping with the past.

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